Top 10 Libraries in Europe

Top 10 Libraries in Europe

Some may claim that the library culture is dying (and good riddance), but the visitors to these libraries would say that’s far from the truth. Bookworm or not, there’s a lot to love about these ten awesome libraries in Europe. From the futuristic Stuttgart City Library in Germany to the practically ancient Saint-Geneviève Library in France, come with us on a tour of the most interesting places to check out a book. You’ll be surprised by what we find, and perhaps even find it in your heart to give the future of libraries a bit more credit.

# 1. The Royal Library Copenhagen, Denmark

In an age where many communities consider libraries a relic from the past, Denmark’s appreciation for the future of the literary world is clear. The Royal Library, known as the Black Diamond for its granite accents, is quite unlike any library we’ve ever seen, with its ultra-mod appearance and sleek interior. It’s also the younger generation figured out—the building’s coffee shop is an irresistible draw on rainy days. We love classic fresco and the in-house concert hall, too, which allows visitors to enjoy more than one type of art.

# 2. Trinity College Old Library, Dublin

Dublin’s Trinity College Old Library really is old—or at least, its books are. Although the library is a mere 400 years old, it contains an impressive array of books dating through twelve centuries, the oldest of which is the famous Book of Kells. Although most visitors come to the library to check out the Book of Kell’s Latin scripture and illumination, they stay for the myriads of other books available for enjoyment. We know there’s a ton of bars you want to hit while you’re in Dublin, but it’s worth it to stop for a bit at the Trinity College Old Library.

Trinity College Old Library, Dublin

Photo by Unknown

Trinity College Old Library, Dublin

Photo by Anastasya

# 3. Stuttgart City Library, Germany

This ain’t your grandma’s library. The Stuttgart City Library has a lot of great reading material, but it’s the super weird shape of the building that makes people want to hang out. The library is built out of glass bricks that glow blue at night, and the interior is totally white and minimalist. Strangest of all, the library is shaped into a reverse pyramid, with layers of floors that get wider as you ascend. Our favorite part? The rooftop terrace, where you can watch the clouds float by while working on that page-turner.

# 4. Library of Birmingham, England

Because we know you’ve always hoped to visit a library that looks like a pile of Christmas presents, we give you the Library of Birmingham in England. The library’s coolest element, for the nerdiest among us, is the Shakespeare Memorial room near the top of the library. There are some first-edition Shakespeare copies in this room, so even if you have no clue what a “spleeny lily-livered codpiece” is, you’ll want to take a look. For the less poetically inclined, the many terraces make a perfect place for some light reading.

Library of Birmingham, England

Photo by tracey_dw

Library of Birmingham, England

Photo by bae22

# 5. Coimbra Library, University of Coimbra–Alta and Sofia, Portugal

Coimbra Library is a series of artwork within artwork. Between the carved wood bookcases, painted ceiling, and oils hung on the walls, it might be a while before you can stop staring and actually crack open a book. On a creepier note, bats haunt the book-lined halls at night, and there is actually a prison in the basement of this library. Maybe they used to throw people in there if they forgot to return library books? We’ll take a $3 fine any day!

Coimbra Library, University of Coimbra–Alta and Sofia, Portugal

Photo by Unknown

Coimbra Library, University of Coimbra–Alta and Sofia, Portugal

Photo by wordman1

# 6. Dokk1 Library, Denmark

“Every time a bell rings, an angel gets its wings,” according to the classic movie It’s a Wonderful Life. In the Dokkl Library, though, the bell is rung every time a child is born at a nearby hospital. Amid the joyful tinkle of birth announcements, people browse the shelves at Scandinavia’s largest library, enjoying both the reading selection and the view. There are plenty of chairs lined up at the floor-to-ceiling glass windows of the room so that the library’s visitors can watch the river below pass peacefully along the edge of the building.

# 7. Vennesla Library, Norway

If the perfect library exists, it’s this one. The Vennesla Library in Norway has a streamlined design that combines the minimalism of modern trends with the quiet comfort you loved in your childhood libraries. Each shelf is not only part of the structural design of the building, but it’s also a reading chair. As a bonus, the reading nooks are equipped with noise-absorbing materials and designs so that people can read in peace. Now, that’s a library. It’s the bookworm’s dream.

Vennesla Library, Norway

Photo by jechstra

Vennesla Library, Norway

Photo by jechstra

# 8. Sainte-Geneviève Library, France

The columned, rectangular structure of the Sainte-Geneveive library looks a bit dusty and old fashioned, and perhaps it is. We shall extend our forgiveness, though, recognizing that it takes a mammoth structure of majestic proportions to be worthy of the Collection of the Abbey of St. Geneveive. Beneath its arches and gargantuan windows, the library contains about two million books and documents, more than you could read in a lifetime.

# 9. The Escorial Library, Spain

If you visit the Escorial Library in Spain, you may think you’ve wandered into an art gallery rather that a library. The ceilings are covered with intricate frescoes, and the shelves themselves are precious objects of art. However, even with all the aesthetic draw, the library’s books and history are still more intriguing. During the Inquisition in Spain, many valuable books and documents were destroyed if they contradicted popular ideology, especially Arabic books and other prohibited works. However, the library was not subjected to search, so the volumes hidden in its corridors remained untouched. They are still there today, relics of the past that survived almost certain doom.

# 10. Malmö City Library, Sweden

The Malmö City Library has three buildings, all with their very own personality. If you’re feeling like a prince or princess, head over to the Old Building, which was built in the 1940s in the style of a Renaissance castle. For a more modern experience, the Calendar of Light is just as beautiful as the Old Building, but in a more updated style. At night, it glows brilliantly through its glass front. Between the two is the Cylinder, which links the two with the info desk and (of course) the very necessary coffee shop.